Brian PCF's Blog

20090202 WOD/Meals

GW
PCF WOD 090202
For Time, 7 rounds of:
1 Clean, Bodyweight (205 lbs)
3 Handstand Push-ups (Scaled to 1 Abmat on 4th Rd)
5 Box Jumps, 30/24 inch
Post time to comments.

Time: 11:27

Post WOD Skill Work: Tuck Sits, 6 sets x 10 seconds. Worked a couple of single leg extended L-Sits in here, but mostly Tuck Sits. I’m doing this progression I found and am going to try to do it every day until I can get to 1 minute on the L-Sit.

Notes: Definitely should have scaled the box jumps up as those were pretty easy. I felt like the Cleans were a good weight as every one after the first round was tough and I dropped my first attempt on the 7th Rd.

I was actually really happy about my HSPU performance as I am absolutely horrible at these. Getting three Rds Rx’d is fine by me, and the Rds where I had the abmat I mostly did unbroken – so good progress on that.

picture-10

Went over on protein and fat today, but ate fairly balanced meals. Just felt hungry a lot today so was trying to listen to my body a little. Probably all out of whack b/c of my really really shitty weekend of gluttony.

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February 3, 2009 - Posted by | Uncategorized

10 Comments »

  1. nice work on the HSPU! I had a rough weekend food wise as well, definitely experiencing the cheat-meal hangover robb wolf talks about, yuck!

    Comment by Ryan P | February 3, 2009

  2. No bacon explosion picture??

    Comment by Jenn | February 3, 2009

  3. You got to touch Nicole!!! You lucky bastard.

    Comment by Sean | February 3, 2009

  4. On a serious note. Are sweet potatoes Paleo compliant?

    Comment by Sean | February 3, 2009

  5. Sean, check out Robb Wolfs blog with regards to sweet potatoes. Although by strict paleo eaters they are not allowed, but he believes they cause no harm. Additionally, OPT eats them so they gotta be good! http://robbwolf.com/?p=272

    Comment by Ryan P | February 3, 2009

  6. Thanks Ryan. By the way who is OPT?

    Comment by Sean | February 3, 2009

  7. Jenn – Bacon pics are coming.

    Sean – OPT won the 2007 Crossfit Games. You can find his website here:

    http://optimumperformancetraining.blogspot.com/

    Comment by Brian PCF | February 3, 2009

  8. Brian, I’ve been on the zone for all of 3 days now and I cross reference your blog every day. One thing I keep going back and forth on is fat blocks. You count fat blocks that the zone doesn’t, such as eggs. I started doing that, but seeing as I’m not trying to lose weight as much as improve performance and shift body fat % a little, I wondered if this would lead to eating too little fat, given that I’m going for 16-16-16 every day.

    Do most zoners do it your way? Do you do it that way because you’re obsessive about numbers like me (remembering that my first foray into zoning I was counting grams, not blocks).

    I’m leaning toward going more basic and just counting protein blocks as protein blocks and whatever fat comes with them, comes with them. As long as I’m not eating KFC, I shouldn’t have TOO much fat.

    In search of data to back that up a little, I did some research on your numbers. Since you are breaking out fat separately, I can calculate calories per day.

    The basal metabolic rate for a 6’1″ 30yr-old male at 205 lbs is 2063 calories per day. Not sure about those numbers on you, but taller and younger would just increase it slightly (and vice versa). Also, this is for a normal dude with normal bodyfat. So not counting your fitness level, which should be higher and not counting any of the calories you burn doing WODs, you still are burning almost 2100 a day just to keep the blood flowing.

    On 2009-02-02 your consumption (21*7*4)+(10.5*9*4)+((21+47)*1.5*9)=1884 calories. Obviously there might be a calorie or two missing in there

    On 2009-01-29 (my calculator doesn’t have a “cheat day” button, so I had to skip a few days) your consumption was 2230 calories. This in spite of your pumpkin seed gorging.

    2009-01-28 = 1700
    2009-01-27 = 1587
    2009-01-26 = 1716
    2009-01-25 = 1888, etc.

    Unless my logic or zoning is wrong (pretty confident the math isn’t) your consuming 200-400 calories below your BMR on a regular basis.

    Which seems to be working for you and I’m just doing your numbers because you have more data and what else am I going to do not sleeping at 5:30? (Jen would say come to the WOD now, I suppose).

    To take this to a conclusion, it seems to me from my reading and our discussions that a big part of the zone is protein/carb balance. Fat has little influence on insulin/glucagon balance and the development of insulin insensitivity that most high carb eaters have. So the important thing is to be consistent on carbs and protein.

    Each day you eat roughly 17 blocks of protein which is 705 calories (476 from protein plus 229 from the 1.5 g of fat in each block). Most days you eat 10 blocks of carbs which is 360 calories, bringing your daily non-fat total to 1065.

    Keeping in mind that restricting calories below your BMR actually reduces your BMR as your body tries to conserve energy, IF you were trying to reach BMR on any given day, your fat intake would be 1000 calories or 74 blocks, the same as 2009-01-29 (pumpkin seed day).

    So my research seems to support you eating more pumpkin seeds. Or bacon.

    Comment by Frizz | February 4, 2009

  9. Mike, two points:

    1) You’re missing some of the calories b/c there is not solely protein and fat in a protein block, nor carbohydrate in a carb block, or fat in a fat block. Each block is going to have some amount of macronutrient.

    While it’s not sizeable, it will up those calorie numbers a little.

    2) Take a look at some of Nicole Carrols nutrition vids on Crossfit.com (http://www.crossfit.com/cf-info/excercise.html#CFJ). She agrees that the calories you’re taking in when you start the Zone will put you in caloric deficit. This will continue until you reach a sub-optimal level of body fat. At this point, you’re going to add fat blocks.

    This has the dual affect of increasing performance and increasing body fat slightly. The way I look at this is that very few competitive athletes have 5-6% BF, most are carrying around closer to 10% whether it be MMA, weightlifting, or Crossfit. While there are exceptions to this, the body seems to operate better around this number.

    Comment by brianpcf | February 4, 2009

  10. 1. Definitely makes sense. I was more about getting some numbers to work with, knowing they wouldn’t be exact. Of course, at the body fat percentage we’re at, it’s not like we’re lacking fat to burn if we don’t eat enough of it!

    2. I will definitely check out Nicole’s vid. Also need to buy 42 ways to skin the zone.

    10% would be like dropping a 15 lb dumbbell off my gut, bet that would make Cindy easier!

    Comment by frizzcrossfit | February 4, 2009


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